Walt Disney’s Legacy – It all started with a Compassionate Mouse

 Walt Disney was a genius. He was born on December 5, 1901, in Chicago, Illinois, in the United States of America. His parents were Elias Disney‍ and Flora. He was a man of vision, with big dreams. He didn’t just live in a world of dreams, he actively set out to make them happen. Those dreams have impacted on the lives of millions of children, young people and adults all over the world – even in some of the poorest nations of the earth. You don’t have to be physically in Disneyland – you can be transported into Walt Disney’s magical world by just reading a comic book or playing with a Disney soft toy or by just looking at a picture of Mickey Mouse. As children we  clamored for all things Disney, but we didn’t have access to them. I recollect they weren’t even available in stores in Colombo, Sri Lanka, certainly not anything from America back then.  My Dad bought us three Disney toothbrush holders – Mickey, Minnie and Donald. Just by looking at the figures as we brushed our teeth, we were reminded of these cartoon characters.

micket toothebrushI was born on an island in the Indian Ocean called  Ceylon, it is now called Sri Lanka. We didn’t have the funds as a family to travel from Ceylon to Disney in Anaheim, California in the 1960s or 1970s. But that did not stop us from dreaming about Disney’s characters. There was no television in 1960s Ceylon. However Disney films were screened in cinemas in Colombo, from time to time. Our favorite was ‘Mary Poppins,’ starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke. The film released in 1964 was directed by Robert Stevenson and produced by Walt Disney. It received 13 Oscar nominations and won 5 Oscars. After seeing the film in Colombo, we learnt a new word: supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

 Back in the 1960s there was a travelling book salesman who would come to our home with a suitcase strapped to the back of his bicycle. This ingenious entrepreneur would bring a selection of books with him. My grandfather was a voracious reader so there was a ready made target market in our home! The travelling salesman would go house to house, visiting homes – inside that suitcase was a treasure trove of books and yes comic books. My parents couldn’t even afford to give us pocket money but our grandfather, out of the kindness of his heart, would buy us a few comic books. There were many power outages, sometimes daily ‘power cuts’ as we used to call them when we were growing up in Colombo – we would stick a candle on a tin and read these books!

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That’s when we first came across the magic of Disney on an island in the Indian Ocean, far removed from the magical kingdom built by Walt Disney in Anaheim in Southern California, in the United States of America.

We seem to have handed down our love for Disney to our children. Our son was born in the United Kingdom in the 1990s. By that time the market was flooded with books, DVDs, CD music, cartoons on the television networks that he could watch and experience the magic of Disney. Charin first came across Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Goofy, Donald Duck, Pluto, Scrooge and all the lovable Disney characters, when he was about three or four years old in the 1990s.

Charin was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Autism has been defined as a ‘complex developmental disability’ appearing in the first three years of life. We bought him Disney videos and he loved them. He used to giggle with laughter and as some children with autism like to do, he used to wind and re-wind the video to the funny parts and look at the scenes over and over again – and scream with laughter. Those Disney pictures stayed inside him.

Charin fell in love with Disney long before he visited Florida. Even though Charin had withdrawn into his own world he was still very visual – Chari thinks differently- in pictures and numbers. Temple Grandin the leading US animal behavior expert who has autism once said: ‘I think in pictures. My mind is like Google images.’ It fits in very well with what Walt Disney imagined, Walt Disney said: “Of all of our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language.”

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Charin at first was not aware of Disneyland in Florida – he had watched all the videos. Our son is a whizz on computers and as he kept looking at websites he came across the Disney websites and then he kept telling us ‘I want to go to Florida.’ That would be his ‘dream holiday,’ A holiday of a lifetime. Finally, we were able to fulfil that promise to our precious son. Life is hard for him and for us but we thank God we were able to use some unexpected money via an ISA which came our way to take him to Florida. It brought joy to his heart.  Walt Disney was absolutely right. Charin was transported into a magical world – it was truly awe-inspiring for him. He loved every minute of it. Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Animal Kingdom, Hollywood Studios, Blizzard Beach…….Charin has been there, done it, worn the t-shirt. Charin had fallen in love with the world of Walt Disney.

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Meanwhile we had heard favorable reports from other British families with autism about their experiences in Florida. People were blogging about it, talking about it. During our holiday to Disneyland in Florida, we were able to present Mickey and Minnie Mouse with a very special Gold Autism Award for spreading that magic to families with autism from the UK. The award was presented to the Vice-President of Disney, Greg Hale, at Walt Disney World in Orlando. Charin was also invited to present the award to Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse. He was absolutely thrilled.

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Many more families with autism are travelling to Disneyland in Florida, to experience that magic. We had prepared him for the journey with a visual timetable. We contacted the airport authorities, the travel company and the airline. Families with autism can never ever take anything for granted. Some young people with autism have a fear of the unknown. Charin wants to know exactly what is going to happen next. When help and support is forthcoming, it really makes it an easier task for families with autism to travel whether it is local, national or international travel. In the past we have worked very closely with Orlando International Airport and Sanford International Airport and the airlines, with regards to families with autism travelling with them. Our campaigning days are over but we were grateful for the opportunity to share with people about the travel needs of families who have children or young people with autism, after all they are paying customers too. On a recent visit we were thrilled to see cast members with disabilities including cerebral palsy and autism being involved as employees – for example making announcements. That was wonderful to see them playing a role as cast members at Walt Disney World. Their lives were being valued by the Walt Disney Company. There are business benefits in employing people with disabilities.

We found the cast members at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida and Disneyland in Anaheim, California so helpful and supportive. We recently visited Disney in California, the cast member at Guest Relations took her time to explain everything to us and to our son. She did not rush us and we were grateful for the time taken and the care given to a family with autism. She looked into our son’s eyes, gave him eye contact and spoke to him, personally, about the day. I have to place on record that it was exemplary customer service. That was our experience.

Charin is into all things hi-tech, he loved Epcot and the hi-tech gadgets. On our  2012 trip to Orlando, we visited Typhoon Beach for the first time and Charin enjoyed every minute of it – although he made a beeline to safety when he saw the six foot wave coming his way! Charin enjoyed the Phineas and Ferb’s agent’s mission at Epcot. He felt like an agent and took the assignment very seriously. Our son was rather scared of the faster rides so anything slow was his cup of tea! His favorite place is Magic Kingdom, he loved to get lost in it. This is where Walt Disney’s ‘magic’ came alive for Charin – whether it was the afternoon parade.(he even danced with his mother following the back of the parade), or Toy Story, Stitch, Star Wars, Soaring, the amazing Castle and all the other characters. It was almost like being on a continuous film set for our son. He enjoyed this constant film reel of pictures and characters.

Charin was fascinated by Walt Disney’s life and he wanted to return to Hollywood Studios to see Walt Disney’s office, his first drawings of Mickey Mouse and his desk.
It was amazing how Charin was able to make the connections between the creator and the creation. It was a striking visual picture for him.

It all started with a Mouse. But the legacy of that mouse has brought the magic, the enjoyment, the laughter, the sense of awe and wonderment even into the life of a young person with autism.

Joy is a fruit of the spirit, when you walk into the Magic Kingdom or any other Disney Park you can clearly see joy on the faces of children and indeed the adults!

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The sheer pleasure of seeing Charin’s face break into a smile has made it all worthwhile for us as a family. Walt Disney’s World was a very enjoyable and fascinating world for this young man of ours. And yes, he wants to return to Disneyland, again and again and again!

Walt Disney was a Compassionate Leader. He doted on his girls. I think his number one desire was to make them happy. He viewed his children through the eyes of compassion, Disney was very much a family man. Disney has been quoted as saying: ‘The most important thing is family.’ He wanted his children to enjoy their childhood. He wanted them to have fun. The ideas just kept coming out of his imaginative mind. Walt Disney was a visionary. He dreamt of establishing an amusement park – Disneyland fired up his imagination – it was going to be a family friendly park where a child’s imagination can run riot. He really believed in what he was doing. Walt Disney was a transformational and charismatic leader. He was an expert in the art of communication and made sure he communicated the vision to his team. Disney has been hailed as one of the most creative minds of all time and led America’s golden age of animation.

Disney wanted to create a world that made people happy. His television show Disneyland became an absolute phenomenon. Children started calling him ‘Uncle Walt.’ He once said: ‘Fancy being remembered around the world for the invention of a mouse!” Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. Disney also earned 3 Golden Globe Awards and 1 Emmy Award. There were many times he experienced failure in his life, he even lost the rights to his first cartoon creation ‘Oswald the Rabbit,’ together with his artists. Despite that setback he picked himself up and went on to create the highly successful ‘Mickey Mouse.’ Walt Disney never gave up on his  dreams, despite experiencing in his own words: ‘a case of the D.D.s – disillusionment and discouragement.’

Walt Disney also used empathy as a powerful leadership tool, stories abound of Disney sending his employees to join lines and to put themselves in the shoes of their customers and see it through their eyes, in order to learn from it and improve on these experiences, in an effort to make things better for people visiting Disneyland. By becoming the other you open up a world of understanding and Walt Disney’s aim was to make every single visitor enjoy the experience. Walt Disney said: “I don’t want the public to see the world they live in while they’re in the Park. I want them to feel they’re in another world.” He also said: “I think what I want Disneyland to be most of all is a happy place–a place where adults and children can experience together some of the wonders of life, of adventure, and feel better because of it.”

Walt Disney was hugely optimistic about the future of the United States of America. In 1971 his love for America inspired the creation of the Hall of Presidents – he honored the nation by honoring the American Presidency – our son absolutely loves the Hall of Presidents in Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida:

This is the first ever Mickey Mouse cartoon film created by Walt Disney and his team of artists and  premiered on the 18th of November, 1928 at the Colony Theater in New York City. . It was the first ever cartoon that used sound to complement the visual pictures – it became an instant smash hit. LIFE Magazine enthused: ‘Everybody liked Mickey. The children who thought he was funny, the philosophers who thought he represented America’s raucous individualism, the aesthetes who saw in him the first successful adjustment of linear design to the fluttering motion of films.’ Mickey Mouse became an overnight star.

Here are Walt Disney’s Top 10 rules of success:

  1. Show some magic
  2. Invest in Knowledge
  3. Diversify
  4. Know your goals
  5. Try it on a small scale
  6. Experiment
  7. Help your Community
  8. Go with your feeling
  9. Day dream
  10. Have a sense of humor

Ivan Corea

Here is an interesting article from the Disney Institute – Leadership lessons from Walt Disney – How to inspire your Team: https://www.disneyinstitute.com/blog/leadership-lessons-from-walt-disney–how-to/

Lessons from a Homeless Man

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My family and I were in church for the early morning Sunday service. Our precious son who is on the autism spectrum, suddenly got up from his chair and said he wanted to go to the restroom. I followed after a few minutes to make sure he was alright. When I walked into the rest room there was a homeless man in there, he was looking into the mirror in the restroom, talking to himself. He saw me waiting patiently for my son. We got talking and he was sharing what he was going through. I really felt for him. Life was very hard for him, sleeping rough on the streets of Redding, California. He had come into the church that morning because he was hungry and on a Sunday, the church feeds the homeless, giving out free meals. He was grateful for a hot meal. It was cold out there, that Sunday morning. I just prayed for him.

The man in the mirror suddenly became sharply focused, turned to me and asked:  ‘Is that your boy?’ I said yes he was. He came up to me, hugged me and said ‘can I pray for him?’ I said absolutely yes. He put his head on my chest and not knowing anything about my son, he prayed: ‘God, please make him better.’ It was a simple, uncomplicated, wonderful prayer from the heart – I believe it went straight to heaven like a dart.

I learnt several lessons from this homeless man that morning. His actions spoke volumes. Sometimes those who have less, give more – despite the fact that he didn’t have any money, he gave from the depths of his heart – he must have felt something for my son who would have walked by, not giving this man any eye contact. This is also a leadership lesson. He wasn’t a big name ‘in lights’, had fame or fortune. He wasn’t a cut above the rest of the flock. He was one of ‘us,’ humanity. This man made an impact on me. I saw him as a leader, not a stereotype. Leadership starts with influencing just one person. He certainly influenced me.

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He prayed with such compassion and kindness for our son. I was deeply moved by this simple, honest prayer. I am sure it touched the heart of his Heavenly Father. I thanked God for this man, his kindness and care – a vulnerable person having compassion for another vulnerable person. There was a leadership shift in that restroom, that Sunday morning. He had an equal place at the table, referred to in Psalm 23, prepared by God, in the presence of our enemies. They certainly wouldn’t be able to do anything about it. He would be seated by the King. The guest of honor. I could seem him with a crown on his head, at that table. A crown given by the King for all eternity. He went that extra mile, way above and beyond, by reaching out in compassion to a young man on the autism spectrum. It’s also a lesson for all of us to reach out to the broken, because the broken will certainly reach out to us – sometimes in the most unexpected way.

Ivan Corea

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Tim Tebow and his “Night to Shine” global event for Special Needs

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Tim Tebow is a big man with a big heart. It is absolutely incredible what he is doing to lift up and show compassion to people with special needs, not just in the United States of America, but all over the world. He has set up a hugely successful ‘Night to Shine’ event in the United States. In his own words: ‘The vision of Night to Shine is to love people with special needs, it’s to bring churches together and to ultimately change the world through the eyes of people with special needs. February 8th (in 2019), will truly be a night people will never forget.’

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So what is ‘Night to Shine?’ Tim Tebow is a devout Christian. His number one priority in life is his faith in God. He has established a Tim Tebow Foundation as a Christian Ministry, an act of faith, focusing on celebrating the lives of all people with special needs. According to his Foundation website: ‘Night to Shine is an unforgettable prom night experience, centred on God’s love, for people with special needs ages 14 and older. This February 8, 2019, Night to Shine will celebrate its fifth anniversary! On one night, 655 churches from around the world came together to host Night to Shine for approximately 100,000 honored guests through the support of 200,000 volunteers! ‘ This is partnership working at its finest, aimed at loving and celebrating people with special needs.

People with special needs are given the Royal treatment. Red carpets, ball gowns, tuxedos, good food, the works. This night stands out. This event also brings together volunteers from local communities, they come to serve people with special needs. What an amazing event that reaches out in love to all those with special needs. Tim Tebow once posted a verse from the Bible on his Facebook page which sums up what he is doing for the most vulnerable sections of society: “‪Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as Christ God forgave you. ” Ephesians, Chapter 4:32‬

The lives of people with special needs have worth and value. As the chorus goes, ‘all are precious in His sight.’ My wife and I campaigned long and hard for autism in the United Kingdom and around the world since the year 2000. We founded Autism Sunday, also know as the International Day of Prayer for Autism, to celebrate the lives of 67 million people with autism. We just did it all of this for love, never for the money. We didn’t have millions to pay for expensive PR campaigns, we were just parents and caregivers, by a miracle it spread around the world, by word of mouth. Coincidentally, Autism Sunday falls just two days after Tim Tebow’s ‘Night to Shine’ event on Sunday the 10th February in 2019. Our campaigning days are over as we believe God is taking our family in another direction. Seasons come and go but hope lives on.

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We have a precious son, Charin who is on the autism spectrum, he is 23 years old. When we were in the United Kingdom Charin attended a special needs secondary school (high school). After students completed their studies in the Sixth Form, (in the UK that is Year 12 and 13), the school held an annual Prom for them, very similar to the ‘Night to Shine’ event in the United States. That was the first occasion that our son wore a black suit, bow tie, black shoes and attended a Prom – it was also the first ever occasion he danced with another special needs girl! Charin was so excited, (and we were as excited as our son, life has been a struggle for him and for us but we so thank God that he has been a blessing to us), our son knew this was something very different. He had heard about the School Proms from films he has watched and shrieked with joy when he was dressing up to attend the prom.

My wife and I found the Prom in our son’s special needs school in the United Kingdom so touching and moving. We were very proud to see our son looking so dapper and seeing his moves on the dance floor – for the first time! He also loved the food! My wife had to drag me away from the scene as I was transfixed and deeply moved! I was  thankful to God, for this moment of compassion, seeing our son celebrating and being celebrated in this way, at his first ever Prom in the United Kingdom. It was a beautiful sight to behold. I salute Tim Tebow for embracing this concept and bringing joy into the lives of people with special needs with his “Night to Shine” event. This is a wonderful act of kindness and compassion.

 Tim Tebow was born in the Philippines on August 14, 1987. He is a former professional American football quarterback and is a current professional baseball outfielder in the New York Mets organization. He has played college football for the University of Florida, winning the Heisman Trophy in 2007 and appearing on BCS National Championship -winning teams during the 2006 and 2008 seasons. Tebow was selected by the Denver Broncos in the first round of the 2010 NFL Draft and spent two seasons with the team. He also played for the New York Jets in 2012. Additionally, he had preseason stints with the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles in 2013 and 2015.

Wherever he goes, Tim Tebow shares his faith in Jesus Christ – on the football field he was known for having the verse John 3:16 on his face patches. “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

Perhaps his greatest success has been to set up the Tim Tebow Foundation and to launch the  inspirational “Night to Shine” event, helping churches to celebrate all people with special needs and that includes starting up a whole worldwide movement to help churches establish infrastructure – in order to welcome and support people with special needs into churches, within  a spirit of love and compassion.

When I think of Tim Tebow, this song comes to my mind. His actions on earth are a reflection of the actions of his Heavenly Father. ‘You raise me up to more than I can be,’ says the song, so I can stand on mountains – there is always hope, even for young people with special needs, their parents and their caregivers.

As a father of a young man with autism, I want to thank Tim Tebow, from the bottom of my heart, for raising up people with special needs, for bringing joy into their lives, for celebrating their lives, for showing them love and compassion with his ‘Night to Shine’ event. He is an all American hero and above everything else a wonderful servant of God who embodies Compassionate Leadership. He brings a touch of Heaven into the lives of the most vulnerable sections of society. He truly is a Servant Leader.

Here are Tim Tebow’s Top 10 Rules for Success – lessons in leadership:

  1. Pursue your passion.
  2. Strive for excellence.
  3. Focus on your goals.
  4. Change lives.
  5. Block out the criticism.
  6. Always give your best.
  7. Set your priorities.
  8. Rise after falling.
  9. Believe in yourself.
  10. Work hard.

Ivan Corea

To support the Tim Tebow Foundation, please access the link:

https://www.timtebowfoundation.org/

Photographs courtesy of Wikipedia and the Tim Tebow Foundation.

Films courtesy of Youtube.

 

 

 

 

 

A moment of compassion on a battlefield during the Christmas Truce of 1914

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It was 1914. The British Army and the German Army were involved in hand to hand combat near Ypres during Wold War I.  It was brutal. Troops on both side were killed or injured in huge numbers. It was one of the deadliest conflicts in human history. Over 40 million military personnel and civilians perished in World War I.  In the month of December 1914, the thoughts of the soldiers went back to their loved ones as it was getting nearer to Christmas, the soldiers frequently sang Christmas Carols in the trenches. Sir Edward Hamilton Westrow Hulse, 7th Baronet and a British Army Officer with the Scots Guards wrote detailed accounts of life in the trenches during World War I. Describing what happened in December, Sir Edward wrote that he was organising a concert party on Christmas Day which would “give the enemy every conceivable form of song in harmony” in response to frequent choruses of  German soldiers singing Deutschland Uber Alles. 

Soldiers on both sides were celebrating the birth of a Saviour, Jesus Christ. What an irony that they were celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace and here they were at war fighting each other on the Western Front. There were ‘unofficial cessations’ of hostilities, particularly during Christmas. Both sides had Christmas trees in the trenches, lit candles and sang Carols.

Then came moments of unimaginable compassion – sadly they were only moments. Captain Robert Patrick Miles who was with the Royal Irish Rifles recalled that moment of compassion in a letter: ” Friday (Christmas Day). We are having the most extraordinary Christmas Day imaginable. A sort of unarranged and quite unauthorized but perfectly understood and scrupulously observed truce exists between us and our friends in front. The funny thing is it only seems to exist in this part of the battle line – on our right and left we can all hear them firing away as cheerfully as ever. The thing started last night – a bitter cold night, with white frost – soon after dusk when the Germans started shouting ‘Merry Christmas, Englishmen’ to us. Of course our fellows shouted back and presently large numbers of both sides had left their trenches, unarmed, and met in the debatable, shot-riddled, no man’s land between the lines. Here the agreement – all on their own – came to be made that we should not fire at each other until after midnight tonight. The men were all fraternising in the middle (we naturally did not allow them too close to our line) and swapped cigarettes and lies in the utmost good fellowship. Not a shot was fired all night. “

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Writing about the German soldiers Captain Miles noted: “They are distinctly bored with the war. In fact, one of them wanted to know what on earth we were doing here fighting them.”

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Then came the football matches on Christmas Day. Football and Compassion on a field of war! Gerard deGroot of the Telegraph newspaper in the United Kingdom wrote: “What a sight; little groups of Germans and British extending along the length of our front,” wrote Corporal John Ferguson of the Seaforth Highlanders. “We were laughing and chatting to men whom only a few hours before we were trying to kill. Fraternisation led inevitably to football. Men who could not otherwise communicate shared a common language in the game. “After a short while somebody punted across a football,” one subaltern recalled. “The ball landed amongst the Germans and they immediately kicked it back at our men … it was a melêe. It wasn’t a question of 10-a-side, it was a question of 70 Germans against 50 Englishmen.” That scenario was repeated all along the line. The locations of these matches remain obscure, in part because few soldiers subsequently admitted taking part.

On January 1 1915, an anonymous major wrote to The Times that an English regiment “had a football match with the Saxons, who beat them 3-2”. That score echoes through the accounts. Yet since the stories originate from various parts of the front, this suggests either incredible consistency in the results, or a remarkable willingness to remember the event in exactly the same way. Equally possible, all recollections might relate to a single mythical encounter that never actually took place. In truth, it matters not if a match ending 3-2 actually occurred, since myths are often more powerful than facts. The “match” is universally celebrated, even by the English who might otherwise prefer to forget another defeat to the Germans. At least it did not end in penalties.

Playing football rudely exposed the contrived nature of wartime animosity. For that reason, it was quickly quashed. Gustav Riebensahm, an officer in the 2nd Westphalian regiment, immediately complained to his commanders that “the whole thing has become ridiculous and must be stopped”. Near Ypres, a corporal named Adolf Hitler voiced the view that fraternisation “should not be allowed”. General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien echoed that sentiment, reminding his subordinate commanders that “Friendly intercourse with the enemy … [is] absolutely prohibited.” An even sterner directive was issued by the 1st Army commander, General Douglas Haig, who warned that soldiers caught fraternising could face a firing squad.

In truth, there was never any danger that goodwill would endure. Everyone accepted that the moment of compassion was just that – a moment. At 8:30 on Boxing Day morning, Stockwell fired three shots in the air, then hoisted a flag with “Merry Christmas” on it. The German captain appeared on the parapet, bowed and fired two shots in reply. “The War was on again,” wrote Stockwell. The guns resumed their murderous cacophony; slaughter resumed. The footballs were put away, ” said Gerard deGroot.

It was a sad moment of humanity and compassion on a battlefield. A brief lull in the fighting and they then resumed hostilities after Boxing Day. Many who met on the field of war to exchange gifts and play football, perished afterwards in a hail of bullets and gunfire.

Ivan Corea

Sainsburys actually produced a film for Christmas recalling the story of the Christmas Truce of December 2014 and the football match between the British and German armies.

Here are some amazing photographs from 1914 of British and German solders meeting together during the Christmas Truce.

 

Photographs courtesy of Wikipedia and Pixaby

Excerpt from an article by Gerard deGroot in the Telegraph newspaper in London titled: ‘The Truth about the Christmas Day Match.” https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11310353/The-truth-about-the-Christmas-Day-football-match.html

Youtube clips from the Sainsbury’s advertisement on the Christmas Truce and the football match and genuine photographs from 1914 from Yesterday Today.

Showing compassion to your enemies

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The quote attributed to Sir Winston Churchill is an interesting one. They say he may not have said it, however it does provoke discussion about having enemies. If you take a stand on an issue, there will be those who will try to bring you down. Churchill had many enemies on the battlefield, in the British parliament and even in his own cabinet. Winston Churchill had a bulldog spirit he did have low moments in his life but he refused to give up and give in – he famously said ‘never, never, never give up,’ and another quote attributed to Britain’s war time Prime Minister: ‘If you are going through hell, keep going!’ He always took the fight to the enemy. Allen Packwood of the Churchill Archives at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom noted:

“Churchill led from the front in his willingness to take real risks to implement an aggressive policy, he was prepared to denude Britain of armour, and to transport it by the quicker, but more hazardous, Mediterranean route. Where he differed from those around him was in the intensity of his desire to engage the enemy. For him it was never just about defence. Victory depended on taking the fight to the enemy on the ground.  “

We come across people who try to bring us down, make us stumble and fall – sometimes even through entrapment. An enemy might violate your fundamental human rights, bring pain and distress to your friends and family, even involve your own children, smear you behind your back, go to great lengths to bring you down, some brazenly use bribery and corruption. There are those who say the only way to stop your enemy is take the fight to them, meet fire with fire, hire lawyers and sue them for compensation. The media is awash with indictments before grand juries, court injunctions, in the United States – in the United Kingdom a few years ago, a huge phone hacking, email and voice mail hacking scandal even brought down a British newspaper who were forced to close down, with millions given out in compensation to people who had been illegally and unlawfully hacked. There are times whenever people resort to evil, it has a ‘boomerang effect,’ however much you try to do things behind your victims back and think you can get away with it – what goes around, comes around. No one is above the law.

The Scriptures talk about a Day of Reckoning – Judgement Day – Ecclesiastes 12:14 says: “for God will bring every deed into judgement, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil. ” Romans Chapter 2 verse 16 talks about that final day: This will take place on the day when God judges people’s secrets through Jesus Christ, as my gospel declares.” Your enemy would do well to digest Romans Chapter 2!

Psalm 23 reveals that ‘he prepares a table in the presence of my enemies.’ It doesn’t say ‘he prepares a table in the absence of my enemies.’ This is the ultimate rebuke to your enemies – they will have to stand and watch from the very edges of society as you eat in the King’s presence, you will enjoy the favour of the Lord and your enemies will not be able to do one thing about it.

So why did Jesus have to take on so much suffering at the hands of his enemies? Here’s a view from the gotquestions.org website: “Jesus suffered severely throughout His trials, torture, and crucifixion (Matthew 27Mark 15Luke 23John 19). His suffering was physicalIsaiah 52:14 declares, “There were many who were appalled at Him—His appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any man and his form marred beyond human likeness.” His suffering was emotional: “All the disciples deserted him and fled” (Matthew 26:56). His suffering was spiritual: “God made him who had no sin to be sin for us” (2 Corinthians 5:21). Jesus had the weight of the sins of the entire world on Him (1 John 2:2). It was sin that caused Jesus to cry out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:46). Jesus’ brutal physical suffering was augmented by His having to bear the guilt of our sins and die to pay our penalty (Romans 5:8).

Isaiah predicted Jesus’ suffering: “He was despised and rejected by men, a man of sorrows, and familiar with suffering. Like one from whom men hide their faces he was despised, and we esteemed him not. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds we are healed” (Isaiah 53:35). This passage specifies the reason for Jesus’ suffering: “for our transgressions,” for our healing, and to bring us peace.

Jesus told His disciples that His suffering was certain: “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life” (Luke 9:22; cf. 17:25). Note the word must—He must suffer, and He must be killed. The suffering of Christ was God’s plan for the salvation of the world. “

So what did Jesus do when he was faced with an onslaught from enemies all around him? He forgave. That was the simple message – forgive. Did he have lawyers at his trial, were there character witnesses to vouch for him – absolutely none. The enemies of Jesus targeted the weakest link in his inner circle. Who was the weakest link? Judas. The keeper of the purse. What was his weakness? The love of money. He is called a thief in John Chapter 12 verse 6:  “He did not say this because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was put into it. ” How did they persuade him to betray Jesus? They bribed him, used corruption, gave him 30 pieces of silver. Give us a sign, kiss him on the cheek they said. Peter denied him three times before the cock crowed thrice. The disciples fled. Jesus was tortured, his face disfigured, a crown of thorns placed brutally on his head, he was physically and verbally abused, spat upon, whipped, battered, bruised, dehydrated, exhausted. And yet he forgave. Great leaders show mercy.

Peter asked Jesus about forgiveness: Then Peter came to Jesus and asked, “Lord, how many times shall I forgive my brother or sister who sins against me? Up to seven times?” Jesus answered, “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy-seven times.” (Matthew: Chapter 18, verses 21-22). In that chapter Jesus teaches us that we are to forgive our brother from our heart. Now learning to forgive can be very hard. How can you forgive someone who has been trying to destroy you and your family – out of sheer spite, hatred, anger, jealousy and has, say, tried to harm your children? Jesus on the cross forgave the robber, forgave all those who had committed those terrible crimes against him – even though it did not excuse their actions.  Jesus taught, “If you forgive others their transgressions, your heavenly Father will forgive you.” (Matthew: Chapter 6:14). Even after the Resurrection, Jesus told his disciples: “Receive the Holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them.” (John Chapter 20: verses 22, 23). Jesus had  a such a deep forgiveness ministry. 

The life, the death, the resurrection, the teachings and the forgiveness ministry of Jesus has resonated with so many down the centuries. The Guardian newspaper of Great Britain noted:” If you think religion belongs to the past and we live in a new age of reason, you need to check out the facts: 84% of the world’s population identifies with a religious group. Members of this demographic are generally younger and produce more children than those who have no religious affiliation, so the world is getting more religious, not less – although there are significant geographical variations. According to 2015 figures, Christians form the biggest religious group by some margin, with 2.3 billion adherents or 31.2% of the total world population of 7.3 billion.”

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Martin Luther King famously said: ‘We must develop and maintain the capacity to forgive. He who is devoid of the power to forgive is devoid of the power to love. There is some good in the worst of us and some evil in the best of us. When we discover this, we are less prone to hate our enemies.’

Richard Branson recently shared on social media the words of a lady from Igniting Change who said: ‘People who are inflicting the most pain (on others) are in the most pain themselves.’ These people who do you wrong could be in terrible torment within themselves. Pray for your enemies, forgive them and bless them, their children and their children’s children.

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Even from a personal perspective, there was a time in my life when I had serious disagreements with my father. It caused so much bitterness inside me. I just didn’t want to talk to him. Then came the realisation that life was too short, God was asking me to forgive him and I needed to seek forgiveness too. So I went and met him, I told him how much I loved him and said: ‘Father, forgive me.’ There was a radical transformation in that precious moment, between a Father and a Son.

My father was 75 years old at the time. After that incredible breakthrough in our relationship, whenever I telephoned him to say I coming to visit him, he would walk up the road and stay near some bollards, waiting for me. The passage of time had mellowed him. When he saw me, he put his arms around me and hugged me, tears rolling down our faces. This was unconditional love. Later that year, my father passed away and I was glad there had been a breakthrough – I was able to celebrate his life at a service of thanksgiving and thank God for that act of forgiveness. When I think of him now I think of him with so much love – the bitterness, the anger has melted away.

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He said love your enemies – here is a clip from Mel Gibson’s ‘The Passion of the Christ.”  When you forgive you don’t keep any bitterness, hatred, anger inside of you. It doesn’t eat into your soul,  crippling your mind and your heart. Forgiveness brings release, freedom. You let go of the angst, that heavy burden will be lifted from you. It will set you free from the shackles of a bitter heart. Forgiveness is a very powerful tool and it releases God’s favour and blessings.

Ivan Corea

 

Quotations from the Bible from the New International Version.

Reference to Christ’s suffering courtesy of  gotquestions.org

Reference from the Guardian article:”Religion: why faith is becoming more and more popular.” Published in August 2018.

Clips from YouTube courtesy of the Passion of the Christ film.

Photograph of Winston Churchill taken from a portrait at his residence in Chartwell, Kent in the United Kingdom.
Photographs courtesy of Pexels and Pixabay.

 

 

 

A Journey through Compassion

Come with me on a journey through compassion. There are many lessons in Compassionate Leadership we can learn from as we take that step into the realms of  leadership,  from both the head and the heart. That is what Compassionate Leadership is all about. We hope to share the leadership experiences of others, including sharing stories connected with compassion and the Christian faith. We hope that this will be a resource to all those seeking to learn about Compassionate Leadership.

Ivan Corea

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

“The LORD is gracious and righteous; our God is full of compassion.”

Psalm 116: verse 5.

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Last updated: (12/8/2018)

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